Product /
Dec 5, 2019

Fence Quarter Debuts Removable Wood Railing Inserts That Save Existing Posts

The inserts come in three styles for deck and porch railings
Fence Quarter Railing Insert

Fence Quarter has debuted a new line of wood railing inserts that allows remodelers and contractors to keep the existing deck posts but replace the railings.

Fence Quarter has debuted a new line of wood railing inserts that allows remodelers and contractors to keep the existing deck posts but replace the railings.

“The era of DIY homeowners has also created the foundation needed for innovation and change within the decking and fencing industry,” the company says. “The Fence Quarter debut line seeks to mitigate the time-consuming, frustrating, and costly ventures associated with traditional decking and fencing solutions.”

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Because decking posts usually last longer than the balusters or infill on a wood deck railing, clients can typically keep old posts even when the infills have rotted away, Christopher Price, president of Fence Quarter, says.

The company claims that its infills are the first that fit onto old posts, thereby saving builders money by using old material. Price says the time is cut in almost half because builders do not have to assemble new posts. After receiving the infills, builders align them with the post openings, insert them, and secure them with the included screws. The inserts are secure but can be easily removed for maintenance.  

Fence Quarter Inserts

Fence insert with geometric pattern

Fence Quarter offers three different designs as of December 2019: a classic vertical style, a grid, and a geometric pattern. These can come in natural wood, pre-primed, or pre-painted, depending on what look builders are going for. The company says clients can buy the pre-assembled inserts with standard sizing or custom order them to ensure they fit the exact measurements of the previous system. 

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To adhere to building codes, the inserts are always 30.5 inches tall. Width is a different story though: From 6-inch- to 6-foot-wide inserts, builders can choose the size right for the project. By using sustainably harvested Alaskan yellow cedar for wood, the company says it promotes environmental best practices, while also creating a product that is knot-free, low-maintenance, and resistant to weather, rot, and pests. 

The company also takes steps to ease the process of future renovation. “If we custom size the inserts, we maintain the measurements for future use. If a tree falls on their deck, or the customer feels like changing the look, it is simple to interchange the styles,” Price says. “The main thing a customer should keep in mind is to paint the frame separate from the inserts so the paint doesn't connect the two.”

[Related: 9 CLEVER SYSTEMS FOR INSTALLING DECKS WITH A HIDDEN-FASTENER LOOK]

Annie Cebulski

Annie Cebulski is the associate editor of PRODUCTS.

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Overlay Init